COURSEs

AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES

AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES 4

The African-American in the History of the United States I

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67.

Note: Meets the Associate in Arts degree requirements in U.S. History, U.S. Constitution, and California State and Local Government. Students analyze historiographical issues in African American history and how black Americans were active agents in creating their own history. Emphasis on the African background of African Americans, the institution of slavery, the development of the African American community institutions, and African American participation in and impact on the Civil War and Reconstruction.

AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES 5

The African-American in the History of the United States II

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67.

Note: Meets the Associate in Arts degree requirements in U.S. History, U.S. Constitution, and California State and Local Government. Transfer Limit UC. Maximum credit one course from African Am Studies 5, Chicano Studies 8, and History 12 or 13.

Students analyze historiographical issues in African American history and how black Americans were active agents in creating their own history. Emphasis on ideas of black social thought, political protest and efforts to create social change from Reconstruction to the present.

AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES 7

African-Americans and the Political System

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67.

Students analyze the relationship of minority groups to American Politics with emphasis on African Americans in the political system. This course gives an in-depth study of the distribution of political power at the Federal and Sate levels, African American political thought, ranging from early 18th and 19th emigrationist sentiments to the nationalist exhortations of contemporary African American culture, including African American feminist and socialist thought.

AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES 20

African-American Literature I

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67.

Students survey African American writers, covering all types of literatures (slave narrative, poetry, novels, etc.) to develop a positive attitude towards reading and understanding the progression of American culture as interpreted by African American writers.

AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES 60

African-American Music

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

A study of African-American Music and their influences on folk spirituals, gospels, concert music, opera, ballet, blues and jazz underscoring styles, characteristics, origin and contributions by African-American Artists.

Credit allowed Credit allowed for only one of African America 60 and Music 135.

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTHROPOLOGY 101

Human Biological Evolution

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67 or equivalent.

This course examines evolutionary theory, human genetics, classification, and introduction to primates, the hominid fossil record, classification, and modern human variation. Students will be able to underline the historical path to natural selection, describe the five factors of the evolutionary process, identify biological characteristics of primates, discuss features of primate behavior, diagram the origin of mankind through comparing skulls from the hominid fossil record, and interpret modern human variation.

ANTHROPOLOGY 102

Human Ways of Life: Cultural Anthropology

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67 or equivalent.

This course establishes the four-field approach to anthropology while covering both anthropological theory and method. Conversations will adopt a holistic perspective to human culture and establish cultural relativism. The objectives of this course are (1) to employ a relative perspective in the appreciation of the world’s cultural diversity, and (2) to apply case studies to describe this variation. The student examines communication, learning, subsistence, economics, family, kinship, gender, ethnicity, politics, stratification, globalization, religion, expressive art, and cultural changes as these all affect our lives, through assigned readings from the text, lectures, discussions and ethnographic investigations, this course will equip you the student with a better understanding of cultural life ways, both past and present, in this time of globalization.

ANTHROPOLOGY 103

Archaeology: Reconstructing the Human Past

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67.

This course is an exploration of the theories and methods of contemporary archaeology and offers a narrative on prehistory.   Students will interpret the peopling of the planet, culture change, and the rise of civilization using the archaeological record. Students will construct a theory-rich research design that reflects current trends in contemporary archaeology.

ANTHROPOLOGY 111

Laboratory in Human Biological Evolution

2 UNITS – (UC:CSU)

Lecture 1 hour. Laboratory 2 hours.

Co-requisite: Anthropology 101.

This course introduces laboratory methods used to examine evolutionary theory, human genetics, classification, an introduction to primates, the hominid fossil record, and modern human variation. Students will use practical research modules to identify biological characteristics of primate using principles of classification, discuss features of primate locomotion, diagram the origin of mankind by employing the comparative morphology of skulls from the hominid fossil record, and use forensic techniques to interpret modern human variation. Students must complete Anthropology 101 or be currently enrolled.

ANTHROPOLOGY  121

Anthropology of Religion, Magic and Witchcraft

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67 or equivalent.

Students learn about the origins and varieties of religious beliefs and practices cross-culturally. Topics include mythology, symbolism, shamanism, traditional healing, altered states of consciousness, magic, divination, witchcraft, and the question of cults.

ANTHROPOLOGY  151

Visual Anthropology: Exploring Culture Through Film Mixed Media

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Students survey and analyze the use of film and video in anthropological research, teaching, theory and methodology. Films are studied for their anthropological content and as artifacts of western culture, which reveal significant aspects of that culture. Students learn techniques in video and audio production in the creation of a final visual product.

CHICANO STUDIES

CHICANO STUDIES 7

The Mexican American in the History of the United States I

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Note: Meets the Associate in Arts degree requirements in U.S. History, U.S. Constitution, and California State and Local Government.

Credit allowed for only one of Mexican American Studies 7 or African-American Studies 4 or History 11. UC limit: One course from Chicano Studies 7, African-American Studies 4, History 11.

This course traces the historical evolution of persons of Mexican descent and their institutions to 1850. It surveys the contributions of Mexican-descended persons to the development of the United States with particular emphasis on the present-day U.S. Southwest.

CHICANO STUDIES 8

The Mexican American in the

History of the United States II

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Note: Meets the Associate in Arts degree requirements in U.S. History, U.S. Constitution, and California State and Local Government.

Credit allowed for only one of Mexican American Studies 8 or African- American Studies 5 or History 12 or 13. UC limit: One course from Chicano Studies 8, African-American Studies 5, History 12, 13.

The course examines Chicano historical experiences from the nineteenth century to the present. The course focuses on the social, historical, and political tensions between American dominant society and Chicano communities. It also examines the U.S. constitution and U.S. political systems.

CHICANO STUDIES 44 (Same As Spanish 16)

Mexican Civilization

3 UNITS (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

This course is a board survey of Mexican civilization and culture. The course covers the periods of prehistoric expansion of Mesoamerica, Pre-Columbian Mexican civilization, the Spanish conquest, the colonial period, and Mexico in the 19th and 20th century.

ECONOMICS

ECONOMICS 1

Principles of Economics I

3 UNITS – (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67 or equivalent.

A course in microeconomics introducing the principles and methods of economic analysis, economic institutions, and issues of economic policy. Emphasis is placed upon production and the allocation of economic resources, and distribution of income through the private enterprise price system.

ECONOMICS 2

Principles of Economics II

3 UNITS – (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67 or equivalent.

A course in macroeconomics emphasizing aggregative economic analysis, including money and banking, national income determination, business fluctuations, and other topics relevant to macroeconomic analysis.

HISTORY

HISTORY 1

Introduction to Western Civilization I

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67.

A study of the main cultural, economic and political trends and events from the rise of civilization in the Near East to the eve of the French Revolution.

HISTORY 2

Introduction to Western Civilization II

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67.

A continuation of History I focusing on the period from the French Revolution to the present.

HISTORY 3

History of England and Great Britain I

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 101

The student explores British culture, emphasizing social, political, and economic issues from earliest times to 1500.

HISTORY 4

History of England and Great Britain II

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 101

The student explores British culture, emphasizing social, political, and economic issues from 1500 to the present.

HISTORY 7

The World’s Great Religions

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Advisories: English 28 and 67

Students survey the historical development of the world’s great religions. A study is made of the origins and growth of major religions with an emphasis on the nature of religions, and religion as a discipline of study.

HISTORY 11

Political and Social History of the United States I

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67 or equivalent.

Note: Meets the Associate of Arts degree requirements in U.S. History, U.S. Constitution, and California State and Local Government.

UC limit: Credit allowed for only one of African-American Studies 4 or History11 or Chicano Studies 7.

Students survey the political and social history of the United States from the colonial period through the Civil War and Reconstruction.

HISTORY 12

Political and Social History of the United States II

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67 or equivalent.

Note: Meets the Associate of Arts degree requirements in U.S. History, U.S. Constitution, and California State and Local Government. UC limit: Credit allowed for only one of History 12, 13 or African-American

Studies 5, or Chicano Studies 8.

A survey of the political and social history of the United States from the Reconstruction to the 20th Century, including the U.S. Constitution, California State and Local Government.

HISTORY 13

The United States in the Twentieth Century

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67 /31 or equivalent.

Note: Meets the Associate of Arts degree requirements in U.S.

The student learns the main events, personalities, and themes of the social and political history of the U.S. in the 20th & 21st Centuries by focusing on their overall impact including a discussion of the country’s central institutions. The student identifies, discusses and describes the historical importance of the events of the period in question.

HISTORY 59

Comparative History of Genocide and War Crimes

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67

The student learn the comparative history of genocide and war crimes in the 20th century and the legal instruments and organizations that have attempted to criminalize acts that fit within the definitions of genocide under international law. Students will also learn the comparative history of cultural conflict (identity), race & racism, and nationalism.      

HISTORY 73

Race and Racism in the United States

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisories: English 28 and 67.

Students survey the development of racial theories and the interactions between ethnic groups in the United States. Students investigate and develop an understanding of how racism has affected intercultural collaboration or confrontation. This course encourages an understanding of the similarities and differences in racial and ethnic experiences in the United States.

HISTORY 78

The Environment in World History

3 UNITS - (UC`:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisories: English 101 and 67

Students learn about the environment history of the world from prehistoric times to the present. This introductory course covers human interactions with the environment in gatherer/hunter, agricultural, and industrial societies, addressing such issues as agricultural revolutions, the collapse of ancient civilizations, pollution, social constructions of nature, the los of biological diversity, environmental ethics, globalization, and climate change.

HISTORY 81

A History of Working People in the United States I

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

The student learns the history of working people in the United States from the colonial period through Reconstruction. Colonial life, the Revolutionary War, the early republic, the market revolution, the rise of urban America, westward expansion, the Civil War, and Reconstruction are examined from the perspective of indentured servants, slaves, farmers, skilled and unskilled laborers, and male and female workers.

HISTORY 82

A History of Working People in the United States II

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

The student learns the history of working people in the United States from Reconstruction to the present. Reconstruction, the gilded Age and Progressive Era, immigration, imperialism, the Twenties, the Great Depression and New Deal, the World Wars, the Cold War and the Fifties, the Sixties, the conservative shift, and globalization are examined from the perspective of people from diverse social groups.

HISTORY 86

Introduction to World Civilizations I

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Traces the development and interrelationships of the major world civilizations and their cultural traditions and contributions from the earliest times to the era of European expansion in the sixteenth century.

HISTORY 87

Introduction to World Civilizations II

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Traces the development and interrelationships of the major world civilizations and their cultural traditions from the era of European expansion in the sixteenth century to the present.

HISTORY 88

Sex in History

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisories: English 28 and 67.

Students explore how various world societies throughout history have dealt with sexual roles and sex drive in social, cultural, and political life.

POLITICALSCIENCE

POLITICAL SCIENCE 1

The Government of the United States

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Note: Meets Associate in Arts degree requirements in U. S. History. U.S. Constitution, California State and local government.

Students study the U.S. Constitution and the major principles, institutions and policies of the American Federal system. Meets Associate in Arts degree requirements in U. S. History. and U.S. Constitution.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 2

Modern World Governments

3 UNITS – (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Students survey several countries around the world focusing on the ‘Third World’ and questions of globalization, democracy, political and economic development and major theories and concepts in comparative politics.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 5

The History of Western Political Thought

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Students examine various theoretical approaches to politics and of basic political problems and proposed solutions: Analysis of selected political theories, relevance of theory to contemporary problems, and new approaches to political thought.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 7

Contemporary World Affairs

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: Political Science 1 or equivalent.

Students learn the major aspects and important issues of international relations and global politics, including but not limited to the study of war and conflict, international organizations and actors, and development and globalization.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 14

Government and Politics of the Middle East

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Students survey the domestic, regional, and international factors which shape the political landscape of the Middle East. They identify and explain sources of instability and violence in the region by focusing on the processes of state building and state disintegration. In addition, in a comparative context, they investigate particular experiences of Middle Eastern countries concerning the nature, roots, and historical evolution of the region’s regimes, nationalism, leadership, and institutions. The approach is thematic, not chronological.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 19

Women in Politics

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: Political Science 1 or equivalent.

Students learn political theories and public policies which shape the various possibilities and strategies for women's political participation in the United States and elsewhere. They also examine the political institutions, processes, and problems of the national, state, and local government.

SOCIOLOGY

SOCIOLOGY 1

Introduction to Sociology

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67 or equivalent.

This course is designed to acquaint students with the major principles of sociology as they are applied to contemporary social issues. With the use of several theoretical perspectives it examines social structures within American society and other cultures from macro and micro perspectives. There are extensive references to contemporary research findings on social structure, group dynamics, social stratification, and social institutions.

SOCIOLOGY 2

American Social Problems

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67 or equivalent.

Students apply sociological perspectives and concepts in analyzing contemporary social problems in the United States. Problems associated with drug abuse, poverty, racial, ethnic, and gender inequality, crime and violence, and the environment are some of the topics addressed.

SOCIOLOGY 11

Ethnic and Racial Minorities in the United States

3 UNITS - (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: English 28 and 67 or equivalent.

Examines global racial and ethnic relations with an emphasis on the United States. There will be extensive use of several theoretical perspectives and an analysis of historical records in explaining minority/majority relations, prejudice and discrimination, and the political and economic status of various racial and ethnic groups. There will be extensive references to contemporary research findings on majority/minority group relations.

SOCIOLOGY 12

Marriage and Family Life

3 UNITS – (UC:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisory: ENGLISH 28 and 67.

Students learn to use theory and research to examine the family and other forms of intimate-partner relationships that exist within a diverse, multicultural society. The students analyze these structures and their functions along with historical changes, emerging variant patterns, and the influence of contemporary society on the family.

SOCIOLOGY 32

Introduction to Criminology

3 UNITS – (UC [pending]:CSU)

Lecture 3 hours.

Advisories: ENGLISH 28 and 67; and Sociology 1

Students examine the basic elements of criminology - the scientific study of crime and criminal behavior. This will include, but not limited to, an analysis of the following concepts; social deviance, crime, delinquency, victimization, the criminal justice system, social control, and terrorism. There is an extensive review of the major sociological explanations on the causes of crime and criminality in addition to a consideration of the biological and psychological perspectives. An examination of the research methods employed by criminologists in the collection and analysis of data will also be undertaken.